Need help? Call! (212) 682-6878 or (718) 459-9477
crisisahead

Windows 7 Support coming to an end? You’ve been warned!

Are you a Windows 7 user? Do you still use old software like Office 2010?
Then we’ve got some important news for you!

Mainstream support deadlines for these products, along with some other ones from Microsoft, are approaching. But, what does this mean?

Mainstream support is the typically five-year period when Microsoft provides free patches and fixes for its products. When a product exits the mainstream support phase, Microsoft continues to provide a period (also often five years) of extended support. This means users get free security fixes but other types of updates are paid and require specific licensing deals.

In other words, free support is ending on January 13, 2015 for a number of major Microsoft products, including all versions of Windows7.
Extended support for Windows 7 lasts until January 14, 2020, so you will still be receiving free security updates, but not features updates.

Some specialists have been speculating, though, that Microsoft will end up pushing out Windows 7’s support dates the way the company did for XP, given Windows 7’s popularity and pervasiveness, but so far, there’s been no word from Microsoft officials that this is the plan.

Support for Office 2010 with Service Pack 1 ends on October 14.
In this case, you have two options. You can migrate to the next available Service Pack (Service Pack 2, in this case), or to the next Office version, which in this case is Office 2013.

 

If you want to be loyal to Microsoft, you can also migrate from Windows 7 to Windows 8. You can buy a hard copy of the program, or you can do the update online. Windows 8.1 Upgrade Assistant will tell you if your PC can run Windows 8, and then will provide you with a compatibility report and optional steps for you to buy, download, and install Windows. If you want to check out the system requirements, you can, but you don’t have to. Upgrade Assistant will do all that for you, and the best thing is that you don’t need to buy the upgrade to run it.

Upgrading Office requires an extra step, because first you need to uninstall the previous version running on your computer. It’s a very simple process, but this new version of the suite doesn’t replace the old one while you install the new one, like previous versions did. You just need to go to the control panel, and perform the uninstall process from there.

 

In any case, if you have doubts or need help, don’t hesitate to contact us. We are here to help you!

 

PcMac Express
info@pcmacexpress.com
(212)682-6878 / (718)459-9477

oldpplpost

Counter the effects of aging and get along with your PC.

Do you know that you can use Windows to personalize and customize your computer to make it easier to see, hear, and more comfortably use. As we rack up birthdays, sooner or later we all experience some loss of vision, hearing, or physical dexterity. Fortunately, personalization options in Windows make it easy to adjust your PC. Here are a few tips on how to counter the effects of aging to make your computer more comfortable to use.
Do you often find yourself fighting the urge to press your nose against the screen because you can’t see text and objects clearly? Have you considered changing your monitor display settings to increase the size of icons or text for documents and Web pages?
All you need to do is:

1. Open Screen Resolution by swiping in from the right edge of the screen, tapping Search (or if you’re using a mouse, pointing to the upper-right corner of the screen, moving the mouse pointer down, and then clicking Search)

2. Enter “Make text larger” in the search box, and then tap or click “Make text and other items larger or smaller”.

3. Drag the slider until the items in the preview image are the size you want them to be.

4. Finally, tap or click Apply.

Having trouble seeing things that are close up? Magnifier, one of the accessibility utilities in Microsoft Windows, opens a window that enlarges all or parts of the screen you choose, just like a magnifying glass. Magnifier enlarges different parts of the screen and is part of the Ease of Access Center. To open it quickly, click Start, and then type Magnifier.

There are three Magnifier modes:

• Full-screen mode. In full-screen mode, your entire screen is magnified. Depending on the size of your screen and the zoom level you choose, you might not be able to see the entire screen at the same time.

• Lens mode. In lens mode, the area around the mouse pointer is magnified. When you move the mouse pointer, the area of the screen that’s magnified moves along with it.

• Docked mode. In docked mode, only a portion of the screen is magnified, leaving the rest of your desktop unchanged. You can then control which area of the screen is magnified.

You can also change the screen resolution, which adjusts the clarity, size, and amount of things that fit on your computer monitor.
If you find yourself searching for mouse pointer more often than you search the Web, you can change the size, appearance, width, speed, color and blink rate of your cursor, or the appearance of your pointer.

Also, to maximize mouse comfort, try a Microsoft mouse that is designed for maximum comfort.

If you have more questions, don’t hesitate to contact us. We can help you!

Heartbleed

A Heartbleed Survivor’s Guide

At this point we’ve all been hearing too much about this new Heartbleed Open SSL’s encryption flaw.

To be honest, the more I heard about it, the harder it became to understand what it means and most of all, how do I protect myself???

First of all lets set it straight. “Heartbleed is an encryption flaw which affects Open SSL’s 1.0.1 and the 1.0.2-beta release, 1.01 which is used widely across the web and in a number of popular web services. The flaw can theoretically be used to view apparently-secure communication across HTTPS, usually denoted by a small closed padlock in a browser’s address bar.

The data potentially at risk includes everything from passwords and encryption keys to financial details and personal identifiable information — allowing a hacker to dip in, swipe data, and leave no trace of their existence.”

After a few days of the world going crazy over Heartbleed, we get to a point where, if your favorite websites, bank, online merchant, etc., haven’t yet fixed the problem. Then you should kiss them goodbye and walk away.

On the other hand, even if they did fix it and made an effort to keep your personal information protected, there’re definitely some steps on your end that you shouldn’t avoid.

  • Change all your passwords! I know it does sound like a hassle, and it probably is, given the amount of online shopping we are used to do these days.
    Even if the websites are already fixed, go ahead and change your passwords anyways! I say this because these sites were vulnerable at some point. That means your private information was already compromised.
  • If your favorite sites or services support two-factor authentication, use it. Everybody understands it’s usually a lot more trouble to set up than a simple password. But if this had taught us a lesson, is that extra security measures are worth it!
  • You should also clear all your Web browsers’ cache, cookies, and history. That’s never a bad idea anyway. You don’t want old memorized passwords walking into trouble at an untrustworthy site.
  • And last but not least. Check your bank and credit-card statements very carefully. If you’ve been compromised, chances are all too good that you’ll find out by finding suspicious charges on your credit cards.

After you’ve done all this, you should be no longer vulnerable to Heartbleed’s nightmare. But beware; no solution is easy when it comes to this one. So if you start getting emails or calls offering to fix the problem, don’t buy it! It will probably be a scam…

If you need help, we’ll be happy to assist you. Otherwise, Good Luck!