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Last year when apple released iOS 5, they brought a new feature to the table called iCloud which features work across the board with your Mac and PC as well.  iCloud lets you access your music, photos and documents from any of your devices (be it an iPhone, iPad or computer) without a complicated synchronizing process.
Once you sign up, you’re given 5GB of free iCloud storage, but you can upgrade it up to 50GB by paying the stipulated fee, of course. This is a somehow expensive service, and that will inevitably add up over the years of use.
Anyhow, Apple has made some exceptions to this 5 GB cap. They have agreed not to count music, apps or books that have been purchased from Apple. Although this is all well and good, most people do not, in fact, purchase all of their music and books from the Apple store, but from a variety of other sources. This, ultimately, pushes a user into a sticky situation because they are forced to pay Apple one way or another.

Nowadays it’s critically important to have a backup of your most important documents. And the amount of devices and options to store these documents have multiplied, making this process easier but also more important than ever.
Storing your backup documents in the cloud will also minimize the storage space used in all of your devices, including your computer.  As easy as this process might be, it requires a fair amount attention from your part. Contacts, calendars, mail, reminders, documents and other data is handled separately and has to be specifically backed up, instead of going through a general backup process.  Organizing your data in order to access it later is also vital to the procedure.

 Any backup strategy starts with the concept of getting the data back. Having everything organized in folders is not a bad idea. There’s a lot of different ways you could organize those folders, always keeping in mind that the best system to organize your data is the one that allows you to find the files you need in the least amount of time. Even your email can be organized in folders.

There’s also a very important issue to address here. Privacy is a key factor when you decide if and which cloud backup provider to use. Microsoft’s Sky-drive doesn’t have the option of encrypted storage, while Apple’s iCloud does. But even when the data is encrypted, the one holding the key it’s usually the cloud service provider. And a curious employee or a concerned government can easily get access to your precious private data. In any case, you face the question of how do they protect your personal information, and whether or not you should just go old school and save your private data in an external hard drive.  But that decision only belongs to you.

Backing up your information is easy as crucial, but you may have some doubts on how and what data should be safely backed up. We can help you on every step of the way, taking the time do it properly. Contact us and keep your data safe!

 

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